LIFE BITE : APIL encourage motorists to ‘back off’ this winter

apple-150579_1280Needless injuries and deaths on NI roads could be reduced this winter if motorists keep their bad habits in check, say campaigners.

The national average number of people killed or injured in snowy, icy and wet weather in Britain is 81 for every 100,000 people according to new figures obtained by the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL).

“Some injuries could have been easily avoided had it not been for bad habits such as driving too close to the car in front,” said APIL president Neil Sugarman.

“According to the Highway Code the average stopping distance, when driving at 30mph on dry roads, is six car lengths. In wet weather this doubles and when it is icy it is ten times longer. Taking care to avoid bad habits like ‘tailgating’ could make a big difference in preventing injuries, and even deaths, on our roads this winter”.

In a recent online poll of motorists, APIL found that two-thirds (67%) do not know how much to space to leave between the car in front when travelling in ice and snow.

This year, the message from APIL is a revival of the anti-tailgating “Back Off” campaign, encouraging a reduction in needless injuries by stopping collisions from happening in the first place

APIL will be sharing safe driving tips and information on their ‘Back Off’ Facebook page and tweeting on the @APIL account all week.  You can find the ‘Back Off Facebook page  here

APIL is a non-profit campaign organisation which has been fighting for the rights of injured people for over 25 years. For more information on the organisation, click here
If you have been involved in a road traffic accident and would like more information on your rights, please feel free to contact us below or email us 

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