LIFE BITE: Men’s Advisory Project calls for more help for male domestic abuse victims

apple-150579_1280The Men’s Advisory Project have called for more help to be made available to male victims of domestic abuse in Northern Ireland. 

The organisation has said that they have seen a notable increase in people coming to them for help – they supported 536 clients in 2015 compared to 294 in 2013. 
The most recent figures from the Police Service of Northern Ireland show that 3,104 men were victims of domestic violence between August 2014 and 2015.

James Knox, the project manager at the Men’s Advisory Project, has highlighted that the support services available for male domestic abuse victims in Northern Ireland are less extensive than for women.

James said: “While the PSNI’s gender-neutral poster campaign is a step in the right direction, there is more that could be done.  If there was more help available for male victims of domestic abuse it would save lives.”

To find out more about the Men’s Advisory Project,  read our ‘LifeSupports’ blog from them or contact MAP at www.mapni.co.uk

For more information on domestic violence, please click here or contact us here.

Protecting Yourself from Domestic Abuse: Advice from a PSNI Domestic Abuse Officer

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Domestic Abuse is a problem within our society as a whole and an issue that the PSNI are increasingly trying to address.

Sergeant Joanne Eakin is a Domestic Abuse Officer with the Belfast Public Protection Unit within the PSNI.   In her guest blog for Life Law NI, Sergeant Eakin provides some useful advice on protecting yourself from domestic abuse.

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Working as a Domestic Abuse Officer within the Belfast Public Protection Unit of the PSNI, I have witnessed my fair share of domestic crimes against both men and women.

The PSNI believe that domestic abuse should not be tolerated and that it is not acceptable in any shape or form in today’s society. Therefore, within the PSNI there are specially trained officers like myself who deal with those victims who are at a risk of serious harm due to the domestic abuse.

I believe that one of the most important things for any victim suffering from domestic abuse to recognise is when it is happening to them and to accept that they are not to blame. Here is my professional advice to those who are suffering domestic abuse or know someone else who is:

I want to escape an abusive relationship – what can I do?

If you are in an abusive relationship and want to leave, follow the advice below to make sure you do not put yourself in unnecessary danger:-

  • Seek legal advice. You might be able to get an injunction or Orders to protect you from your abuser after you leave.
  • Get immediate medical help for any injuries you sustain. Record and photograph them.
  • Take anything that will identify your abuser, such as a recent photo or car details, to help others protect you.
  • Be extra careful about who you discuss your plans with because secrecy will increase your success.
  • Take a note of emergency numbers and people you can contact (family, friends, doctors etc). Programme them into your mobile if you have one.
  • Prepare a bag with essential items, such as clothes, keys and money. Get extra copies of your home or car keys. Keep it safe or give it to someone you trust.
  • Keep important documents, such as birth certificates, mortgage papers or passports, in a safe location. If possible, take any items of personal importance with you, such as photographs or jewellery.
  • Talk to your children about the possibility of leaving and try to take them with you, whatever the long-term arrangements might be.
  • Plan an escape route out of your home and teach this to your children.
  • Keep a note of the family’s essential medicines and have an immediate supply available.
I know someone who is in an abusive relationship – how can I help them?

If you have a friend or family member who is being abused, there are practical things you can do to help them:-

  • Find out information about your friend / love one’s rights and the services available so they can make informed choices – for example, contact specialist support agencies such as Women’s Aid who can provide practical and emotional support.
  • Agree a code word or action that if he/she says to you or you see, you know they’re in danger and cannot access help alone.
  • Find out information for your friend / loved one so they can make informed choices.
  • Get some support yourself. You have to be strong if you’re going to be able to help them. Most domestic abuse services are happy to help with any worries you may have or provide suggestions as to other actions you might take.
  • Most importantly, don’t give up on them. You might be their only lifeline.

Useful points of contact

There is much support in Northern Ireland for victims of domestic abuse. If you are suffering from domestic abuse or know someone who is, here are some useful contacts:-

Police Service of Northern Ireland

For non-emergency calls and general enquiries, call 101.

In the case of an emergency dial 999 or use the emergency text phone by texting 18000

24 Hour Domestic and Sexual Violence Helpline

This line is available to anyone who has concerns about domestic or sexual violence, now or in the past. It is open to all women and men affected by domestic and sexual violence. Please call 0808 802 1414

Women’s Aid

Women’s Aid is the national domestic violence charity that helps up to 250,000 women and children every year. They work to end violence against women and children and support over 350 domestic and sexual violence services across the country. Call Women’s Aid on 0808 802 1414 or visit their website www.womensaidni.org

Men’s Advisory Project

This is an excellent service for men experiencing domestic abuse. Call on 028 9024 1929 or visit their website www.mapni.co.uk

Your GP

Your local GP can offer help and support. Many people experiencing abuse believe that their GP can be trusted with disclosure and can offer practical support.

Social Services

Social Services can provide practical assistance and guidance to those suffering from domestic abuse. Contact your local Social Services office for more information.

Domestic Abuse is a serious offence which no one should have to suffer. If you are the victim of such abuse or know of someone who is suffering, please contact the PSNI for advice and assistance.

Sergeant Joanne Eakin│Domestic Abuse │Belfast Public Protection Unit

If you would like any further information on domestic abuse please contact us here at Life Law NI

The PSNI & Domestic Abuse Officers

PSNISergeant Joanne Eakin is a Domestic Abuse Officer with the Belfast Public Protection Unit within the PSNI.

Here, Joanne provides a guest blog telling us about the role of a Domestic Abuse Officer and how the PSNI deal with incidents of domestic abuse.

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The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) receives a report of a domestic incident on average every 18.4 minutes…. That is 78 domestic incidents per day.

This will increase on the run up to Christmas and the PSNI will soon be launching their Christmas Campaign to encourage victims of abuse to come forward.

How do the PSNI view domestic abuse?

The PSNI believe that domestic abuse should not be tolerated and that it is not acceptable in any shape or form in today’s society.

Therefore, they have specially trained officers who deal with those victims who are at a risk of serious harm due to the domestic abuse. I am one of those officers. We are called ‘Domestic Abuse Officers’ and work within the 5 Public Protection Units across the province. I cover the Belfast area and work from Antrim Road PSNI Station in Belfast which consists of 2 Sergeants and 10 Constables.

What do the PSNI class as domestic abuse?

The PSNI are fully aware that domestic abuse can include a range of behaviours and is not solely physical abuse which is a common misconception. Domestic abuse can involve any one of the following:-

  • Physical abuse – for example, being pushed, hit, kicked and beaten.
  • Emotional abuse – for example, being verbally abused and humiliated, constantly blamed, being put down in front of other people and being kept away from family and friends.
  • Financial abuse – for example, being left without money, having wages, benefits or pension being taken away from you or having to account for all your spending.
  • Sexual abuse – for example, being forced to watch or act out pornography, being talked to in a sexually degrading way, being sexually assaulted or raped.

Some abusers think domestic abuse is acceptable as they are married to the victim but that is not true. Some victims also do not realise they are being abused.

The important thing for any victim is to recognise is when it is happening to them and to accept that they are not to blame.

How can the PSNI help me if I am the victim of Domestic Abuse?

The PSNI and the various Domestic Abuse Teams throughout Northern Ireland are here to protect, help and support victims of domestic abuse in many different ways:-

  • Investigate – We guarantee to fully investigate any incident that has occurred and take action against the perpetrator if there is sufficient evidence.
  • Protect – We will protect you and your children from immediate or further harm and advise you in relation to criminal proceedings and police procedure.
  • Inform – We can provide information on local domestic abuse support agencies that can give emotional and practical assistance.

For non-emergency calls to the PSNI and general enquiries, call 101.

In the case of an emergency dial 999 or use the emergency text phone by texting 18000

Domestic Abuse is a serious offence which no one should have to suffer. If you are the victim of such abuse or know of someone who is suffering, please contact the PSNI for advice and assistance.

Sergeant Joanne Eakin│Domestic Abuse │Belfast Public Protection Unit

If you would like any further information on Domestic Abuse please contact us here or leave us your details below

 

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign

Today marks the beginning of ‘The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign‘.

This  international campaign originated from the first Women’s Global Leadership Institute coordinated by the Centre for Women’s Global Leadership in 1991.  It spans from 25th November 2015 ( the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women)  to 10th December 2015 (Human Rights Day) and is a time to galvanize action to end violence against women and girls around the world.

To mark the occasion, the Belfast Domestic Violence Partnership have provided us with ’16 Facts for 16 Days’, an  infographic outlining eye-opening statistics relating to domestic violence worldwide.

Please feel free to share this infographic on your own social media and highlight the importance of the 16 Days of Activism Campaign

BELFAST DVP 16 facts final (2)

If you would ike further information or advice on domestic violence, please feel free to contact us here at life Law NI

16Days

The Men’s Advisory Project (MAP)

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There is a growing awareness that it is not just women who can be victims of domestic abuse and partner violence.

PSNI statistics for the year 2014-2015 show that there were 3,107 male victims of a domestic abuse crime in Northern Ireland.  There were 67 domestic homicides recorded by the PSNI between 2005/06 and 2014/15 – 36 women and 31 men lost their lives to current or former partners or family members during this period.

Many men who are the victims of domestic abuse can find it difficult to get support.  It can also be hard for men to acknowledge the abuse and talk about their experiences.  This silence could be due to a number of reasons, including love for a partner, embarrassment or shame, concern for their children and fear of not being taken seriously or perhaps being blamed.

The Men’s Advisory Project provide a confidential counselling, information and referral service for men experiencing domestic abuse or the pressures of a breakdown in a relationship.

Our Services

Confidential Counselling

MAP provide counselling services for all men experiencing domestic abuse. MAP can provide support and help men understand their options and make their own choices and decisions.

MAP also offer support and counselling services to men who have previously left a violent or abusive relationship and who are still experiencing the effects.

Information & Referral

Whilst they do not provide advice, MAP can provide men with information and signpost them to other organisations that can help them; these include a number of voluntary, community and statutory bodies.

Anger Management Work

MAP also offer a range of services to both men and women who want assistance and support to deal with their anger. These services are available to those who wish to understand powerful emotions, cope better with stress in their lives and adopt more appropriate behaviours for healthy relationships.

Awareness Raising

MAP also provide awareness-raising sessions, such as speaking at conferences or stands at events on male victims of domestic abuse and the issues they face.

MAP offer services across Northern Ireland and work to help end domestic abuse.

For more information on the services offered and the support provided by the Men’s Advisory Project,  you can call them between 9am – 5pm to either their Belfast office (028 9024 1929) or Foyle office (028 7116 0001) or email the organisation at info@mapni.co.uk
Don’t suffer in silence. Get the help and support you need with MAP.

Men’s Advisory Service, 5th Floor Glendinning House, 6 Murray Street, Belfast, BT1 6DN

www.mapni.co.uk